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Domenick Lombardozzi as Sean "Mac" McGrath in RAY DONOVAN (Season 6, Episode 07, "The 1-3-2"). - Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME - Photo ID: RAYDONOVAN_607_439.R.jpg Domenick Lombardozzi as Sean "Mac" McGrath in RAY DONOVAN (Season 6, Episode 07, "The 1-3-2"). - Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME - Photo ID: RAYDONOVAN_607_439.R.jpg

Ray Donovan

Requiem for Mac: How Domenick Lombardozzi won Ray Donovan fans

Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME

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Domenick Lombardozzi’s Mac went full circle on Ray Donovan, illustrating the fragility of the human mind to the ebb and flow of fleeting emotional state.

All it takes is one crummy day or disheartening phone call in Mac’s case for the strongest of exteriors to collapse, their hourglass reversing to empty in seconds. Imagine officer Sean ‘Mac’ McGrath pulling Ray Donovan out of the East River, saving a life against the will of its owner, literally kicking and screaming. In fact, getting rewarded with a few brute punches to the noggin along the way for his troubles… Yet, staying true to the honorable duty he swore to uphold, hand to heart. Staten Island’s finest.

Then envision the same man, broken beyond repair, sitting alone and destitute in his car, emotionally bankrupt. Momentarily contemplating the work required to push his ex-wife’s relationship back uphill to ever see his son again… Before finally letting go of the behemoth stone without opposition. Allowing the increscent moon-sized rock carrying life’s ever increasing troubles to roll backwards, crushing him in the process. Exiting the equation forever with a singular shot heard in the distance outside of a cheapo, rinky-dink motel’s forsaken parking lot.

Domenick Lombardozzi’s dynamite portrayal of Mac on Ray Donovan left a permanent mark on both Ray’s family and the show’s gallery of Sunday spectators. Bridget makes note of it when she tells her emotionally tormented father that she ‘doesn’t want him to end up like his friend in a parking lot.’ Mac’s untimely demise was a warning shot to Ray’s psyche, a foreshadowing of a yet to be written chapter in his life if he doesn’t obtain the necessary help. The side-by-side juxtaposition of Ray’s leap and Mac’s final juncture boldly unavoidable, always able to save everyone but themselves. Mac had told Ray, “We could have been brothers in another life,” in this case Mac representing the older brother from which to take in example from.

Symphonies of Acting Art by Domenick Lombardozzi

Domenick Lombardozzi’s interpretation of Mac, a regular ‘Joe’ on the surface, is anything but. Lombardozzi delievered a dauntingly complex performance of a man with the comforting, secure outwards nature of a bulldog internally dueling with the realities of being an officer. The job that became his identity ultimately consumed him and by extension, his family. Year by year chipping away until the way Ray met him, living by himself eating his son’s birthday cake in a drab room flush of life.

At the same time, Mac’s universal appeal comes from a genuine place of heart. A man’s man enjoying a good game of baseball on the tube with a pal, drinking a pint at his local pub, and owning an undying loyalty to those sacred to him… Even during the turbulent times when they despise everything he represents. The valor of silent masculinity much like Ray.

Opening Sonata: “Walk Away Ray”

A three word phrase that would become the hallmark of Mac’s captivating run on Showtime’s Ray Donovan. The first movement of Mac’s symphony featured this bluntly direct warning to Ray outside in the broad daylight of a police precinct. As is often the case when one tells someone else not to do something, they’re even more aptly motivated to do the opposite. Mac’s overture had no immediate effect on Ray, despite its reliable source.

“Walk Away Ray” would ominously serve as a source of pressure to the viewer, hooking them in through Lombardozzi’s exemplary delivery. Even without audio like the animation above, the story is told in Mac’s eyes without one audible word.

Adagio: “I can’t remember the last time I felt good”

When it comes to the Adagio slow-tempoed descent of the second movement, no scene stands out like Mac’s outward monologue with Bridget as his audience. The portrait of an individual juggling the consequences of past sins with his latest… Being indirectly forced to be an accomplice to the kidnapping of his best friend’s daughter to protect his own family. In this sequence rife with tension and the white noise of a movie from times past, the audience witnesses Mac’s final introspective plunge.

From the constant apologizing to Bridget Donovan for what he’s done, bargaining with her that they’ll take his family too if he doesn’t do what they tell him. “I don’t care what happens to me.” Then arrives the most brutal line, “I can’t remember the last time I felt good,” with the man legitimately trying to remember. Tears welled up in his eyes. Every ounce of the sentence is felt, the sorrow of a real human being who’s lost their way, stuck on a linear path despite their original hopes and dreams.

Scherzo: “You were the only one who ever thought I was worth something.”

The final uplifting moment in Mac’s story is the scherzo, an attempt at redemption for a lifetime of diverting from the person he was on the inside. Mac returns Bridget to Ray knowing it symbolizes the end of a ‘normal’ life, forever a target on his family’s back as leverage against him. Mac earnestly comments that Ray was, ‘The only one who ever believed he was worth something,’ and, ‘We could have been brothers in another life.’ Recalling again the notion of the linear path, pre-determined circumstances out of both Mac and Ray’s control. Mac’s raw honesty akin to the days of one’s youth, before the competition of adulthood demanded a stern mask. One without a public display of weakness at any avenue.

Allegro: Celebrating the life of Sean ‘Mac’ McGrath

Domenick Lombardozzi’s first-class performance as officer Sean ‘Mac’ McGrath was one of the many superb, regal highlights of Ray Donovan’s sixth season. Every audience member was left with the feeling of, ‘Gone too soon,’ upon his departure despite seeing the writing on the wall in that parking lot. The reverie of the esteemed man who rescued Ray Donovan from certain death in the season’s premiere. Forever intertwining Ray’s life with his as brothers, eventually to his detriment. When he pulled Ray out of the East River that day, he never left its depths.

Be sure to watch my interview with Mickey Donovan himself, Jon Voight, at last year’s Tribeca TV Festival!

Nir Regev is the founder of The Natural Aristocrat. You can directly contact him at nir.regev@thenaturalaristocrat.com for coverage consideration, interview opportunties, or general comments.

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Ray Donovan

Terry Donovan: Is there Life without Health?

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Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, "Hispies". Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.
Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME

Terry Donovan’s health shows zero signs of improvement and potentially never will. His mind and body have separated, divorced. They are no longer a team, just roommates.

This article contains spoilers for Ray Donovan Season 7 Episode 4 (“Hispes”).

The prerequisite basics to life remain but is Terry Donovan really living? Regular everyday activities we all take for granted are being stolen right under from Terry’s fingertips as every minute passes. The home remains but the wallpaper is peeling off. What should have been a beautiful memory to reflect on for Terry, sleeping with Liberty on tonight’s Ray Donovan episode…. Became personal shame and emasculating embarrassment. Permanent scar tissue.

Liberty [Louisa Krause] attempting to offer comfort in the aftermath could not console the unconsolable. A proud man like Terry Donovan, a boxer, cannot bathe in Liberty’s sorrowful looks of pity to go from “caterpillar to butterfly.” No matter how well intended on Liberty’s part.

Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, “Hispies”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Which is why after Terry understood his new alternative healing method was just more false hope, something to distract from the traffic where he’s ultimately heading… He placed rocks in his clothes and headed to a close-by waterfront, hoping to sink to the bottom of the ocean. “I know where this is heading.”

What once was achieved with ease is now a luxury and gradually becoming a pie in the sky dream. Soon it will take the strength of ten mountains to achieve what his body was once capable of. As if the very weight of gravity has changed. Terry does not want to spend the rest of his life asking for assistance, to feel like a burden, even tossing around the idea of euthanasia on his own.

Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, “Hispies”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Dolores’ rescue

Yet, a woman in his group named Dolores [Lois Smith], seemingly in the same hopeless situation as Terry Donovan is trying to save him. It’s not because of naivety…. Dolores is aware just like Terry that this last stopgap of treatment after everything else has failed is likely a mirage. No cure through metaphors, no matter how pretty. However, Dolores wants Terry to live, she does not accept that, ‘There isn’t much he’d miss.’

Lois Smith as Dolores in RAY DONOVAN, “Hispies”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Thus, through pure will of mind rather than a feat of strength, in contrast to what Mac once did for Ray pulling him out of the east river… Dolores was able to walk Terry Donovan out of an attempted self-drowning. Perhaps, Terry [Eddie Marsan] is not that different from his father Mickey Donovan or even Sandy Patrick after all in one respect…

Terry needs others with him on this journey, wherever it may lead. Even if it’s the road to physical deterioration and decline. One person that understands and is going through the same thing he is.

This time around, Terry Donovan’s opponent in the boxing ring is his own body… Failing him. A matchup he cannot overcome simply through a quick jab or uppercut. Only mind over matter.

Read more of The Natural Aristocrat’s Ray Donovan coverage in the Ray Donovan category section.

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Ray Donovan

Ray Donovan Season 7 Episode 2 Review: Epic surprise, one of TV’s best

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(L-R): Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan, Liev Schreiber as Ray Donovan, Pooch Hall as Daryll Donovan, Dash Mihok as Bunchy Donovan, Graham Rogers as Smitty and Kerris Dorsey as Bridget Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, "A Good Man is Hard to Find". Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.
Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME

Ray Donovan’s latest Season 7 episode “A Good Man is Hard to Find” appeared as bleak as ever, Ray on the brink of collapse… Until one of TV’s great all-time surprises.

Warning: This review contains major spoilers for Ray Donovan Season 7 Episode 2.

In the ultimate bit of irony to Ray’s statement tonight, “There are no happy endings to a Mickey story,” there was one. We’ve become accustomed as TV viewers not just as Ray Donovan fans but for every series in the modern era to be pessimists. Thus, even though it seemed rational that Mickey Donovan would survive his brush with death, IMDB records listing future episodes for Jon Voight, promo photos, even a mention this episode of a missing body… It seemed less and less plausible as the episode went on that Mickey’s future appearances wouldn’t just be flashbacks/hallucinations. Abby Donovan style. Sure, the series has teased Mickey as a goner before. Last season with the faked heart attack in the Season 6 trailer but this time was different.

There was a gradual, sophisticated buildup with the clover leaf tattoo/gas tanker in the Season 7 premiere that made this occasion feel real. Especially, on the heels of losing massive co-lead Abby Donovan and Season 6 breakout star Mac, it seemed like everyone is fair game potentially.

Kudos to Writer/Director Joshua Marston for breaking away from the pack of TV grief givers. He had us all going, even the usually stone-faced Ray was shedding waterworks and showing raw emotion over his father’s “passing.” Then the door knock happened and despite being met with a customary Donovan family greeting, a punch to the face…. There was no Donovan fan or family member that wasn’t grinning from ear to ear. Marston has given TV audiences hope once again.

Jon Voight as Mickey Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Nobody wants to see Mickey Donovan take that final bow, not now, not ever. For once, expecting the worst, hoping for the best came true. There will be no relishing and holding onto every flashback and hallucination as the cameos dwindle down this time around. Mickey is alive and in the flesh, taking actions in the present. Not a ghost, not living in someone’s mind when they’re on the floor, rock bottom. The Joker to Ray’s Batman, forever to continue this dance.

Amber’s internal debate and Ray’s best scene of the episode

Kate Arrington as Amber in RAY DONOVAN, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Mac’s ex-wife Amber was offered money by Ray for the recently deceased to take the rap for several Donovan murders during Bridget’s kidnapping. Initially Amber accepted the offer reluctantly, a revised story for what would have been the equivalent of Mac’s pension. In the tale, Mac goes down heroically shooting after the crooked officers threatening his wife and child before taking his own life. Ray in turn, places Mac’s belongings/clothes and DNA at the scene of the crime. At the last second, however, Amber called Ray and decided she couldn’t do it. She offered the money bag back to Ray but he wanted her to keep it anyway.

Liev Schreiber as Ray Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Ray had been experiencing devastating guilt and emotion after seeing Mac’s son again. In an excellently acted scene by Liev Schreiber, he holds back tears as he tells Mac’s son that his “father loved him very much… He told him that.” There was something about this scene that really resonated as a change in Ray’s character after the therapy sessions on his own youth. Seeing Mac’s son as a younger Ray, feeling indirectly responsible for why his father wasn’t coming home anymore. Mac had told Ray to stay away last season after all.

Terry’s Change

Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan in RAY DONOVAN, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME.

Terry presumably drank Ayahuasca last episode, and both his body and mind don’t seem to have reacted well. Terry’s head was noticeably shaking as he left the ‘alternative medicine’ spot early in the episode. Later on, he was uncharacteristically verbally brutal toward Daryll, who just wanted a photo of Mickey with all the Donovans together for his urn. Terry also left his phone behind, which could provide major leftover evidence with all of Ray’s missed calls, voicemails and text messages. However, the brew did give Terry a vision of what would happen to his father… Will these visions continue as Season 7 progresses?

Ray Donovan Season 7 Episode 2 Review Score:
8.9 Score

Be sure to check out The Natural Aristocrat’s interview with Sandy Martin on Sandy Patrick and more Ray Donovan coverage!

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Interviews

Sandy Martin talks Ray Donovan’s Sandy Patrick (Interview)

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Sandy Martin as Sandy Patrick in Ray Donovan season 6, episode 4 "Pudge" - Photo Credit: SHOWTIME
Photo Credit: SHOWTIME

The Natural Aristocrat spoke with Ray Donovan’s Sandy Martin about her extraordinary performance as the multilayered, true to life Sandy Patrick.

There’s a family member in all of ours hidden somewhere in the soul of Sandy Patrick on the sixth season of Showtime’s Ray Donovan. Actress Sandy Martin’s portrayal was so effectively comforting that Mickey and Bunchy weren’t the only ones who let their guard down, it was us. Close your eyes and you can still visualize the iconic sizzle of a lit cigarette as Sandy rides off a heist as a presumed millionaire. Ice Cube’s “Drink The Kool-Aid” roaring in the background with the thumping heavy bass of the car’s audio system. A Donovan in every sense of the word.

Martin told The Natural Aristocrat about the grand experience of working on the series this past season. The juxtaposition of a character longing to escape her loneliness while robbing herself of the opportunity by taking the money bag. Only to realize it wasn’t impressing others that she was after… It was having a family to call her own again. Having a purpose instead of just a home.

Interview with Sandy Martin on Ray Donovan’s Sandy Patrick:

The Natural Aristocrat [Nir Regev]: Was it decided early on that you’d have the same first name on Ray Donovan? How did that happen?

Sandy Martin: All I know is by the time I was shooting my third episode, one of the producers said to me, “We wrote this role for you because you auditioned for us once before. You were so funny and great, we never forgot you!” I think because of that, they used my first name Sandy.

How often did you get to ad-lib on the show? I’ve seen a lot of fans, myself included, love the “Cop Kebab” bit!

(laughs) They have a little bit of wiggle room but mainly the reason I was attracted to the show is because the writing is so, so fantastic! And it’s up my alley. I mean, of course, I ad-libbed here and there. Like when I’m telling him all the jokes in the living room and they all rush out the front door, and I go “Wahh, fun buster!” That was definitely something I buttoned down the scene with. But you know the writing is fantastic, I love the writing on the show. I trust it!

Speaking of Ray Donovan’s writing, how do you feel the show depicts Sandy Patrick’s story arch relative to the Donovans? It seems like Sandy is riding in euphoria after she takes the money, only to discover there’s no one to show it off to. That all her old friends have passed.

I just think they need a hideout and remember that their long lost brother Cormac had a widow and she was a live wire and a lot of fun. But that’s not their first reason for looking her up! The first reason is that nobody would ever think to take the house of a widower from the Vietnam war which was so many years ago. They were smart to figure out to go to her house.

She mentions once or twice that she’s been a bit lonely and that’s why she’s playing horrible comedy nights at horrible bars. Making stupid jokes that she thinks are funny. She needs to meet some more friends because she’s lost quite a few of friends, as we find out later. The tricky part about Sandy Patrick is why would she run off with all their money when she finally has some family in her life? But I guess money talks, bullshit walks! (laughs)

Would you like there to be flashbacks showing Sandy and Cormac’s relationship next season?

Well yeah, but I don’t know what plastic surgery we’re going to need to have to make us believable! (laughs) Sandy Patrick is dedicated to every kooky aunt you’ve ever had that danced in a party bombed out of her mind, with a lampshade on her head. I just think that they stumble into coming to her house and then realize that, “Hey, we can relax around here!” I’m like a scammer myself. You know? I get in this nun’s outfit and he says, “Well, what are you doing?” And I said, “Haven’t you ever heard of a clerical discount?”

I’ll go out and pretend I’m a nun and beg on the street, I’ll do anything. So they hit gold when they arrived at my house… Because I’ll do anything to have all those hunky men around for me to put the make on! (laughs)

I thought whenever they said, “Go to Sandy’s,” on the show you knew something was going down. It always delievered too, like in the season 6 finale when you chopped that guy’s head off!

(laughs) I’d like to say that I come from these people because I have a lot of relatives that are detectives and cops in Brooklyn and stuff like that. But certainly me and my family are not running around chopping people’s heads off! I think it’s just that New Yorkie, Boston attitude, and I’m originally from Philadelphia.

I’ll never forget Esquire magazine once ran a survey on all these popular towns in the United States and Philadelphia came up as the vendetta state! (laughs) So, I’m used to that kind of rowdy East Coast toughee stuff. It’s a pleasure to be back in those shoes after living in L.A. for so long.

What was it like shooting that dance scene with Jon Voight? It felt organic and really had a classic Hollywood feel to it. As if Sandy and Mickey were right there dancing in your living room.

Yeah, Jon’s very creative in that sense! In the last few episodes when Bunchy’s in the room he dances with him a little as well. When Sandy was dancing with Mickey, I was playing that I was so bombed, that it was just making me sad that my husband wasn’t there.

Sandy Martin as Sandy Patrick and Jon Voight as Mickey Donovan in RAY DONOVAN (Season 6, Episode 04, “Pudge”). – Photo Credit: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME – Photo ID: RAYDONOVAN_604_1210.R.jpg

Mickey tried to cheer me up and I’m just trying to function because I’m not used to plowing one whiskey after another. But when Sandy’s in this crowd, she’s just letting it flow. So I sort of played it like, “Okay, you want to dance? Well, I can barely stand up but I’ll have fun with you for a minute!”

I thought your character had a interesting relationship with Bunchy. One second you’re taking care of Bunch in a grandmotherly fashion then the next, you’re openly flirting with him. How did you feel about the scene where Bunchy tries out the priest uniform with Sandy in the room?

I’m really flirting with him, I say from the minute he walks up to my front porch that he’s “well endowed for an infant!” That was the clincher line for me! I had a couple of people swimming around me for jobs and when I read that line, I went, “Well, I’m in!”

Then, I showed him the back bedroom and he’s gonna have to sleep on the floor but I tell him, “I’m happy to share!” So I’m trying to get one of Bunchy and Mickey into my bed… But I don’t know as Sandy Patrick, the back story of Bunchy’s traumatic experience with his priest. She can’t play that because she doesn’t know that, you know? So she’s just like, “Oh come on, put that thing on! Don’t worry!” She’s a little bit lighthearted about it because she doesn’t know what the poor guy is going through.

I thought that was a really fun scene to do because I act like, “Come on, we’re going to take pictures! You’re just going to wear that.” I think he’s just uncomfortable wearing something different. I had no idea about his past history and that’s why I go, “Okay, come on you can put this on!”

I thought one of the most memorable scenes, if not the most memorable, this season was right after you stole the money. When you see Sandy smoking in the car and listening to Ice Cube rapping, delighted. It was just a really fun scene! When you were reading the script did you think she’d get away with it?

Oh, she thought she was going to get away with it! She just has a whim, she’s bombed, everyone’s passed out in her living room, then gets up and sees all that cash there and loses her mind! She stuffs the cash in her bag and takes her bottle of vodka and hits the road in her crappy car. I don’t think she thinks of the consequences too much at all. Her plan was to get together with her friends and wave some money around, take them for big dinners, and buy them things that they needed. She was gonna play God for two seconds.

In the back of my mind, in my back story… I think after I’ve spent some money, I’ll go back and return it, because I miss them. You know? The key to this character to me is how lonely she’s been and now she has a house full of fun. So when Bunchy catches me, chokes me, and is yelling “Where’s the money?! Get in the car!” Daryll is like wait a second, ‘This is a really old lady! Why are you tossing her around like that?’

Dash Mihok as Bunchy Donovan and Sandy Martin as Sandy Patrick in RAY DONOVAN (Season 6, Episode 08, “Who Once Was Dead”). – Photo: Jeff Neumann/SHOWTIME – Photo ID: RAYDONOVAN_608_01.R.JPG

And next thing you know we’re in the car and I’m telling this story about two guys, the snap monologue. One of my favorite pieces of material! Big Peter and Peter the painter, they were playing a game of snap and suddenly two 10s come up. Then Bunchy, even though he was so pissed at me and he’s lost so much because of me… He couldn’t help but think, “Christ what a funny old lady she is.” Dash Mihok had this kind of sneaky smile on his face after I finished that monologue.

My favorite Sandy joke this season was the cannibal clowns saying ‘You taste funny!’

(laughs) That was one of my favorites too! I love it! That’s one of my favorite jokes because it worked better than, “Did you know that pigeons die when they have sex? No. Well, the ones I have sex with do!” I think that’s one of the worst jokes I’ve come up with! But I’m trying it out because I want to do it a comedy night and Bunchy breaks my fun.

When you work on Ray Donovan, do they generally tell you your character arc ahead of time. Do you know if your character is going to make it into the next season or do you just go episode by episode?

They just tell you when you’re working and get over to Brooklyn because I live in L.A. now. You know I got very little direction. I mean, some people said a few little things to me but I just went with the rhythm I think is right for that character. Everybody was laughing so much that they didn’t want to mess with me as far as changing things up. But no you don’t really know what’s happening.

I jokingly said to show runner David Hollander, “Well… After chainsawing somebody’s head off I guess I’m not going to live very long!” (laughs) He goes, “Oh don’t worry, don’t worry! That’s not a problem at all.”

I thought your performance was incredible this season and you had great, seamless chemistry with the entire Donovan family. Especially with Mickey, all your scenes together felt so effortlessly natural on-screen.

Thank you! Jon Voight is a wonderful actor and he’s very thorough in his approach. One thing David Hollander told me is he couldn’t believe how easy it was for me to just sink into this family, and get all the different people. All their different jokes and rhythms. He was impressed by that. I said, “Well, these are my people. What are you talking about?!”

Eddie Marsan as Terry Donovan, Pooch Hall as Daryll, Kerris Dorsey as Bridget Donovan, Sandy Martin as Sandy Patrick, and Jon Voight as Mickey Donovan in RAY DONOVAN (Season 6, Episode 12, “The Dead”). – Photo: Mark Schafer/SHOWTIME – Photo ID: RAYDONOVAN_612_4401.R.JPG

Do you feel your acting method has changed significantly since you started?

I’m very lucky that I can do drama and comedy believably. I go from ridiculously different roles. A couple of years ago I played this really sad sack, goofy, losing your mind, mother of Tennessee Williams in the last play he wrote called, A House Not Meant to Stand. It was in a renowned theatre here in L.A. called The Fountain Theatre and people just couldn’t believe that I went from Mac’s mom on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia where I’m this weirdo who doesn’t speak, just grunts to very believably this sad old woman who’s just lost her son but has a sense of humor.

But now, Sandy Patrick to me is so thrilled to have people back into her life because she never remarried. And these are her people. Now they’re in, thick as thieves. I mean, they’re in it so deep, they have to stick together. They’re not going to just pull away from her house and say, “See you! We’re going to stick you with three bodies in your backyard!” I’m really glad I can switch gears and play different kinds of roles, where it’s a certain caliber of a person. Where you can say, ‘They’re not that awful yet!’

I feel that’s what makes Ray Donovan’s characters so special because they all have their own flaws but they’re still extremely likable. Every single one of them really, even dangerous ones like Sam Winslow.

Yeah, that’s true about Sam Winslow. I’m sad to see her go actually, I was like, “What?! Woah…” I unfortunately had no scenes with her. I have my own little pack back in the house of sin! (laughs)

In-between seasons of Ray Donovan, you’re playing the role of Verna The Secretary in Disney’s upcoming reboot of Dumbo! How did you go about becoming part of the timeless franchise?

I used to hang out with Tim Burton back in the Beetlejuice days because a friend of mine, Glenn Shadix, was playing the Interior Decorator (Otho). The big guy with the crew cut hair. He unfortunately is not with us anymore but he had a lot of parties at Tim Burton’s and his own house, so I knew him. And the DP on Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was also the DP on Dumbo.

They were saying, “Where are we gonna get somebody who sounds real New Yorkie or East Coastie or whatever to play Michael Keaton’s (V. A. Vandevere) henchwoman?” The one guy (Ben Davis) who was the DP said, “Well, we had this funny old lady on Three Billboards, her name is Sandy Martin,” and Danny DeVito was sitting there and goes, “She’s on my show!” Then Tim Burton says, “You mean Sandy Martin from the 80s? Yeah, she is New Yorkie… Okay, let’s fly her out!” (laughs)

So I was given that job and it was great to see Tim again. I don’t have a very large role, but Tim Burton works magic with little funny characters bobbing in and out of his fantasies. I was thrilled to be there! I play the head of the secretarial pool and I have a bunch of secretaries that I bark at. They run around and help me!

Thanks Sandy!

Thank you!

Check out Sandy Martin’s official website to watch some artful moments in her Drama, Comedy, and Combo acting reels! Be sure to catch Dumbo when it arrives in cinemas across the U.S. on March 29, 2019.

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