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Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino and Ryan O'Callaghan as Jack Anderson in 79 Parts: Director's Cut - Photo Credit: Ari Taub Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino and Ryan O'Callaghan as Jack Anderson in 79 Parts: Director's Cut - Photo Credit: Ari Taub

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Why you should watch Johnny Solo as Gino in ’79 Parts: Director’s Cut’

Photo Credit: Ari Taub

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Actor Johnny Solo gave a breakout performance as horse track race swindling, easy livin’ Gino in new comedy film, 79 Parts: Director’s Cut.

The following article contains minor spoilers for 79 Parts: Director’s Cut.

Every once in a while an actor catches your attention by playing a character that feels so true to life, it’s like a person you’ve already met. Johnny Solo’s performance in 79 Parts: Director’s Cut harkens back to raw, old school humor, the type you’d see in a 70s-era Israeli Bourekas film or even Jackie Chan’s 1978 picture, Drunken Master. The lovable, sort of lazy, creative hustler always looking to pull a quick ‘combina’ (fast one) instead of working. It’s a universal formula, we all know someone like this at some point of our lives… Yet, we can’t help but befriend them. For all his trouble, Gino spells excitement and opportunity in lead character Jack Anderson’s [Ryan O’Callaghan] life.

Sure Gino’s methods are gray area, usually less on the legal side but his confidence throughout the film is infectious. Simply put, you want to believe, and sometimes the quarter comes up Tails in life like he promised. Early on in the film, Gino’s pal Jack lets it slip that the race Gino bet on (and won) was fixed, leading to a viewer comforting chase scene by the other gamblers.

Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino and Ryan O’Callaghan as Jack Anderson in 79 Parts: Director’s Cut – Photo Credit: Ari Taub

Comfortable in the sense that you can just turn your mind off and enjoy, no lengthy metaphors and allegories to ponder. The late night comfort food of cinema if you will. The appetizing chase instantly attracts curious onlookers, gazing over what you’re watching on the tube. The type to ask for just one fry but end up staying for the whole movie.

Johnny Solo’s character is defined by his body language and physicality. Mildly reminiscent of Seinfeld’s Kramer in the way he physically embraces those closest to him, arm on the shoulder and such… And has absolutely zero inhibition! He goes to the track with an obvious fake beard in tow, has no qualms about wearing risqué, silly clothing, or pilfering a stand for it. Gino is as gritty as can be and direct about his ‘me first’, often self-centered behavior.

Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino in 79 Parts: Director's Cut - Photo Credit: Ari Taub

Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino in 79 Parts: Director’s Cut – Photo Credit: Ari Taub

When Gino tells Jack he’s got another horse tip after Jack just got a very shady, risky loan from his uncle, he informs him, ‘It’ll help me… Okay, we’ll split it you’ll get something too.’ The selfish nonchalance of it all is what makes Gino a fun character. At the same time, you can tell he has the best of intentions for his friend, as long as it benefits him in some way first.

Even when Gino discovers his best buddy just got married to a girl named Anna, his first thought is why he finds out the info last. He’s relentless in trying to figure out if pal Jack has business with his uncle that he’s cutting him out of the loop from. During all of this, Gino is fully aware that he ‘kind of screwed’ Jack over prior but can’t help putting himself first.

Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino and Daniela Mastropietro as Anna in 79 Parts: Director's Cut - Photo Credit: Ari Taub

Pictured: Johnny Solo as Gino and Daniela Mastropietro as Anna in 79 Parts: Director’s Cut – Photo Credit: Ari Taub

[Spoiler Warning:]

The delightful Italian accent of Anna played by another film standout in Daniela Mastropietro, perfectly compliments Gino’s vagabond roughness later on. Gino attempts to pull another fast one with a doctored wedding album to help his friend’s sham marriage out. However, Anna is not a fan, immediately sensing they’ll be caught and presenting a drawing Jack made instead. The smile on Gino’s face when giving the doctored photo album to immigration says it all. A total comedic contrast to Anna’s worry that she’ll be sent of the country. It’s what makes each scene Gino is in fun and wholly unpredictable.

[End Spoiler]

Likewise, Gino’s relationship with his uncle Dennis [Aidan Redmond] is what complete’s his arch. Despite Jack seemingly looking up to Gino, uncle Dennis sees him for what he is. Always reluctant to help him out and trying to figure out what his nephew’s angle is. One of the best parts of the film is when Dennis sends his nephew to dig randomly, without informing him what he’s digging from. Gino shovels aimlessly as punishment, unknowingly looking for a lost wedding ring. A wedding ring that Dennis’ wife Vera [Lisa Regina] demands be found, no excuses.

Johnny Solo’s character Gino is one you’d like to see again in a sequel or on a weekly TV sitcom. The kind of character where you’re curious what shenanigans they’re up to this week. That’s not easy to craft in any performance, comedic or not. Selling believability is an acting skillset not to be taken lightly.

79 Parts: Director’s Cut Film Trailer and Info

79 Parts: Director’s Cut is available now on Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, and YouTube.

Visit the 79 Parts: Director’s Cut official website for more information about the film which features Oscar nominated actor Eric Roberts and a landlord guest role by Sandra Bernhard. 79 Parts: Director’s Cut is a Safier Entertainment and Factory Film Studios film by Hit and Run Productions. The film was directed by Ari Taub with the screenplay / characters being penned by Mario Radosta along with Chuck McMahon and John Ramaine.

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Ellen Toland talks Inside the Rain, objectification and job titles (Interview)

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Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor in film, Inside the Rain - Photo Credit: Art 13
Photo Credit: Art 13

Ellen Toland spoke to The Natural Aristocrat about Inside the Rain’s Emma Taylor and society’s inability to separate job title from human being leading to a culture of objectification.

Ellen Toland’s Emma Taylor in new film Inside the Rain is a quiet looking glass into the day-to-day treatment of commodified human beings. When the fantasy of body sushi and the gentlemen’s club ends and a person trying to resume their regular life off-the-clock begins. Yet, separating the person from their job title appears a distant hope, like spotting individual blades of grass outside. It’s for this reason, among many others, that Emma Taylor finds comfort in another person pre-judged by society. One born with bipolar disorder and treated as such at all times to personal detriment. Even scorned in suspicion for taking their medication due to repetitional bias.

Meet Ben Glass, Inside the Rain’s lead protagonist. Ben is largely defined by one act during Into the Rain, an attempted suicide via overdose. In turn, Ben is later accused of another such attempt when he’s spotted simply organizing his medicine for the week… Leading to an unjust arrest and potential exclusion from university. Thus, Ben Glass decides to make a film about all the events leading up to the arrest as a proactive visual defense. Better Call Saul’s Jimmy McGill once told Scholarship interviewee Kristy Esposito that, ‘You made a mistake and to them that’s all you’ll ever be,’ and it feels highly applicable to Inside the Rain’s plot. Much like Jimmy tried to drive Kristy to fighting forward even without the scholarship, Emma Taylor feels Ben can be advance forward in his life without going back to a University that preemptively shunned him.

This interview contains spoilers for Inside the Rain.

Interview with Ellen Toland on Inside the Rain’s Emma Taylor:

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

Nir Regev [The Natural Aristocrat]: A good portion of TV & Film audiences are unable to disconnect the character they see on-screen from an actor in real life. During Inside the Rain, these fraternity looking, rich jocks bother Emma Taylor outside of the strip club she works at. Unable to separate the fantasy of body sushi from a regular person having a smoke after work. I was wondering how you feel about that?

Ellen Toland: Oh, that’s a really, really good question. I think that’s a feminine issue especially and it’s pretty ingrained in masculine culture. To objectify women, having a hard time separating the fact that they are not an object and something to toy with. I feel that’s what that scene really plays upon because those guys definitely don’t see a difference between a human being and their sushi tray.
And I think that’s a real issue with our culture in general.

It’s something that people really need to assess within themselves. I think that happens with people and titles of their jobs in the first place too. We don’t see past the title of what people do, and we make that their entire identity… And then treat them with that sense.

Do you feel Emma’s openness lends itself to accept a bipolar person intimately into her life despite his involuntarily asylum stay? There’s many that would have second thoughts after seeing someone forcibly institutionalized but you decide to donate Ben $5,000 dollars for his student film.

Yeah, I feel Emma’s seen a lot of different types of people and has a deep well of empathy & understanding for people. She kind of sees that with Ben but I also think it’s matched with Ben’s acceptance of her and building her up. Which I don’t think she’s had a lot of in her own life. It’s the perfect combination of both of them meeting each other exactly where they’re at, building each other up, and ultimately eventually move on in their own lives.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

What was it like shooting the scene where Emma’s having dinner with Ben’s parents and mentions she works at a strip club?

Yeah, Cathy [Curtain] and Paul [Schulze] were lovely, it was great to work with them for a little bit!

I think my choice going into the dinner was that Emma hadn’t been introduced to a lot of parents and treated normally. She’s meeting their possible judgment by just really owning it and trying to almost test them out too and see how they’re going to react. When it’s met with genuine acceptance as well, she’s pleasantly surprised. Shooting that scene was really fun and the restaurant was very sweet to us as well, we ate a huge meal! [laughs] That was great, never bad to get to eat on set, you know?

Catherine Curtin as Emma Glass and Paul Schulze as David Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

I saw an interview with you and Aaron Fisher where he said, ‘During auditions it just kept going back to Ellen, Ellen, Ellen!’ What do you think was that X-Factor won you the role?

Ultimately, I feel Aaron and I had a pretty natural chemistry. One that you can’t really manipulate with actors necessarily. All the pieces fell together. We really had a good energy together and you really need that in a romance. (laughs)

Inside the Rain left things a little bit open ended for the ending. Why do you feel the choice was made not to send the audience home feeling ‘warm and fuzzy’ with a full happy ending?

I mean I think it was also being realistic to what really would happen in real life. Aaron was also basing the film off of his own life. He wanted to play to the truth of that. And I think they both needed to go and own themselves. They’d been given that confidence, and that’s what’s so good about the flash forward at the end.

It showed that that’s why Ben made that choice, that he really could move forward and ended up with the person he was meant to be with. We have people in our life all the time that are just chapters that are meant to lead us to end of our own story, it doesn’t make those chapters any less important.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

Inside the Rain feels so much like art imitating life. I have to ask… Is Emma Taylor the real name of the girl portrayed in the film?

Oh, no it’s not her real name! (laughs) It’s loosely based off of someone but it’s definitely not the same name! There’s elements of Aaron’s life in the film, I’d say 60/40 but the film is loosely biographical. Like the last ten years all stirred around into one movie.

Do you feel being aware that Aaron knew this person impacted your interpretation in any way? Or did you still approach the role in the same way you would any other?

You think about it for sure but you also want to create your own vision of it and own that. Aaron and I definitely talked a ton about Emma but he gave him lots of room to make my own decisions. Aaron’s an actor’s director!

There was kind of a frugal moment toward the end at the fast food joint where Emma is adding everything up on her head. It seemed based on those sexually fueled videos she was making outside of her main job and the $5,000 donation that she’d be rich. How do you feel about that scene?

That scene is trying to say that she’s working really hard to get where she is, and knows the worth of a dollar. Feeling at the same time that Ben hasen’t had that kind of struggle. I think you can be making a lot of money and still be frugal. You remember how hard it was to get there.

Why do you feel that despite ‘red flags’ being present, Emma decides to donate the money for Ben’s film? Did Ben’s dream become Emma’s dream and intertwined at that point?

Yeah it all becomes mixed up. I think it also becomes her dream. Emma sees this person that she cares about and understands how important it is to him. There was no too big of a feat to make that dream come true.

Would you like to reprise the character of Emma Taylor potentially in another film?

I love Emma! She’s so brave and strong, I really adore her. If there is an Inside the Rain: Part 2, sure. I mean Aaron and I are really good buds, I love working with him. I’d love to work with him again, of course!

How much of yourself do you see in Emma as a character?

I think that any person you play, you bring an element of yourself. There’s things that are different, there’s things that are the same but I don’t think it’s necessarily conscious. You just bring as much of your research on their perspective of the world as you can. Whether that’s the way you move or even read things. Maybe there’s pieces of yourself in that. It’s a weird little mixed up bag.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

I saw you studied over in RADA, one of the best acting schools in the world. How do you feel it established your foundations as an actress?

It was amazing! I loved it, some of the best professors I ever had were there. It was something I’d always dreamt of doing and I loved London. It was a really important step in developing my craft. Everything that people say about it… It’s all true! It did not disappoint.

Thanks Ellen!

Thank you!

Follow Ellen Toland on Instagram and visit her official website for the latest news on her upcoming projects! Visit InsideTheRainMovie.com to learn more about the film.

Read more Film and Television interviews in The Natural Aristocrat’s Interview category section. Be sure to watch The Natural Aristocrat TV with Host Nir Regev interviewing leading talent in the entertainment and sports industry on-camera!

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Domenick Lombardozzi in Cold Pursuit: Fantasy football and loyalty

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Domenick Lombardozzi in Cold Pursuit: Fantasy football and loyalty - Nicholas Holmes as Ryan Calcote and Domenick Lombardozzi as Mustang - Screenshot Photo Credit: Summit Entertainment / StudioCanal
Screenshot Photo Credit: Summit Entertainment / StudioCanal

Draft picks in fantasy sports act as surrogates to the type of person you really are. “Well, they’re my home team. What’s a man without loyalty?” – Mustang’s [Domenick Lombardozzi] double entendre in Cold Pursuit.

This article contains spoilers for 2019 film, Cold Pursuit.

Around the 34:15 minute mark of Cold Pursuit, there’s a seemingly innocent but meaningful conversation between ‘senior enforcer’ Mustang [Domenick Lombardozzi] and his boss’ young son Ryan Calcote [Nicholas Holmes]. Mustang requests advice from the prodigy-like youngster for his Fantasy Football league… Demoralized by constant losing. “I can’t… I can’t win a game.”

Ryan inquires if Mustang is playing for money, testing the waters as he examines the squad. Mustang confirms and the youngster immediately notices a pattern, “You have four Cleveland Browns on your team.” In effect, Mustang has placed all his eggs in one basket, hedging his bets entirely on the whims of one battalion for victory. Mustang responds, “Well, they’re my home team. What’s a man without loyalty?” In essence, clearly identifying what kind of person Mustang is and gives him away. Loyal to a fault, always going down with the ship… Even when there’s a life raft within fingertips’ reach.

Nicholas Holmes as Ryan Calcote and Domenick Lombardozzi as Mustang – Screenshot Photo Credit: Summit Entertainment / StudioCanal

As such, Ryan tells him, “I can’t help you,” sensing Mustang to be a lost cause. If Mustang had approached his fantasy football team in a black and white, unattached, purely mathematical stats-based manner… He’d likely be on the road to gridiron victory already. However, Mustang let the emotional attachment of his home team get the better of him to personal financial detriment. He was willing to sacrifice both his wallet and perception as a skilled drafter to colleagues/friends in order to appease players he’d never even met.

Thus, being accepted as a Cleveland Browns supporter by some invisible corporate eye is more important to Mustang than any kind of personal gain. This mentality equals a favorable feeling to losing ‘honorably’ as part of a team, instead of ‘dishonorably’ winning as an individual. Without giving too much away from the the film, Domenick Lombardozzi’s Mustang would go on to experience loss in other areas of life than fantasy football in Cold Pursuit. It raises the question, at what times is social acceptance more important than individual success?

Watch the memorable acting scene featuring Domenick Lombardozzi & Nicholas Holmes in Cold Pursuit, now streaming on HBO Go and available to rent or buy on Amazon. HBO is available as a Channel on HBO as well for non-cable subscribers.

Be sure to read Requiem for Mac: How Domenick Lombardozzi won Ray Donovan fans on The Natural Aristocrat.

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Stanley Kubrick

National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico to perform Kubrick film music

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La Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México (OSN) will be performing two nights of Stanley Kubrick film music titled 'Kubrick Sinfónico Reloaded' or Kubrick Symphonic Reloaded at Palacio de Bellas Artes. - Photo Credit: INBAL / Palaciode Bellas Artes
Photo Credit: INBAL / Palaciode Bellas Artes

La Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México (OSN) will be performing two nights of Stanley Kubrick film music titled ‘Kubrick Sinfónico Reloaded’ or Kubrick Symphonic Reloaded at Palacio de Bellas Artes.

The National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico (La Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México) will be playing a full range of iconic pieces from Stanley Kubrick’s films on Friday, March 6 (8 pm) and Sunday, March 8 (12:15 pm) in Mexico City’s Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes).

According to INBAL (Mexico’s National Institute of Fine Arts and Literature), eleven compositions will be featured total from Barry Lyndon, A Clockwork Orange, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Shining, and Eyes Wide Shut. * “Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 and 4” are counted as one piece for the above INBAL link’s number of 10. José Luis Castillo will be conducting/guest directed the show with Juan Arturo Brennan narrating the event with the history of each piece. The presentation will be part of OSN’s ‘Programa 5’, or fifth program of the season.

The Full Program:

2001: A Space OdysseyJohann Strauss/Performed by the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Herbert von Karajan. (version for film) – “The Blue Danube”

A Clockwork OrangeBeethoven/Wendy Carlos (version for film) – “Suicide Scherzo (Ninth Symphony, Second Movement, Abridged)”
A Clockwork OrangeEdward Elgar – “Pomp And Circumstance March No. 1”
A Clockwork OrangeEdward Elgar – “Pomp And Circumstance March No. 4”
A Clockwork OrangeHenry Purcell/Wendy Carlos (version for film) – “Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary”

Barry LyndonFranz Schubert – “German Dance No. 1 in C major”
Barry LyndonFranz Schubert – “Piano Trio in E-Flat, Film Adaptation of the Opus 100 2nd Movement”
Barry LyndonFrederick The Great – Hohenfriedberger March *

Eyes Wide ShutDmitri Shostakovich – “Waltz No. 2”
Eyes Wide ShutFranz Liszt – “Grey Clouds”

The ShiningGyörgy Ligeti/Wendy Carlos (version for film) – “Lontano”

Kubrick Sinfónico Reloaded: Ticket Availability

Tickets for the event appear sold out on Ticketmaster for Sunday’s event and no longer available online for tonight’s performance. If you’re a local resident, your best bet might be to go to the venue’s box office.

More Stanley Kubrick Coverage at The Natural Aristocrat

Be sure to watch The Natural Aristocrat’s exclusive one-on-one interview with Stanley Kubrick’s daughter Katharina Kubrick and view a walking video tour of the ‘Envisioning 2001″ exhibit at NYC’s Museum of the Moving Image.

Footage of the entire ‘Envisioning 2001′ press presentation featuring a Q & A session with Katharina Kubrick is also available!

The Natural Aristocrat examined the greatness of Barry Lyndon’s use of Handel’s ‘Sarabande’ duel music and how it layered the film. Read more Kubrick articles on The Natural Aristocrat’s Stanley Kubrick category section.

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