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Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Interviews

Mary K. DeVault talks Ms. Lorelei’s Corner on The Purge (Interview)

Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

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Mary K. DeVault spoke to The Natural Aristocrat about portraying host Ms. Lorelei on The Purge’s pro-NFFA, pro-Purge children’s program, Ms. Lorelei’s Corner.

The first minutes of The Purge’sHail Mary” are a beautifully set piece of New Founding Father propaganda, 1984 Orwellian-styled dystopia, classical agitprop. Ms. Lorelei’s Corner was one the show’s landmark cold openers, instantly palming your attention and holding it there. Impressionable youngsters being led by the glitz and glamour of their charming host to the party-in-power’s agenda leanings. The razzle-dazzle of their teacher shepherding not only the audience in attendance but an entire nation’s youthful viewers watching on television.

Actress Mary K. DeVault played Ms. Lorelei, spinning into her grand entrance donning a richly colorful Disney-like Princess dress with long gloves. Trustworthy at first sight, capturing the audience’s heart, subduing their mind blissfully from thinking too critically of the lead message. A soothing visual to Purge viewers at home, recalling their own childhood programs, with layers of complexity waiting to be explored.

During an exclusive interview with The Natural Aristocrat, Mary K. DeVault discussed crafting The Purge’s Ms. Lorelei on-screen, her background in children’s theatre, and the deeper question of Nature vs Nurture when it comes to the series’ characters. DeVault loved every moment of working on the series, calling it a top production all around and relishing the opportunity to work with Ms. Lorelei’s Corner audience members like Zoe [Emily Criss Rives].



Interview with Mary K. DeVault on Ms. Lorelei’s Corner:

The Natural Aristocrat [Nir Regev]: I recently asked one of your Purge co-stars Amye Gousset (Lena Dash) about the whole Nature Vs. Nurture aspect of The Purge. Viewers see Ms. Lorelei’s Corner, a kids-oriented Pro-Purge show, juxtaposed with a young Ben Gardner smashing up a doll on the “Hail Mary” opener. Do you feel Ms. Lorelei’s Corner is what influences Ben to become violent, that he was born with those tendencies, or it’s a mix?

Mary K. DeVault: I did have some interesting theories on that! I just thought the character was so well written. There’s things like The Warrior Gene, which is based around studies that it could be biological. How some people could have this in them already but it needs culture and society to really bring it out. Not everybody becomes a killer or an aggressive person. I feel the writers really did their research when they put these kind of things in there. It creates something for you to think about.

I find this character very interesting in that way because it gives you a lot to play with. I mean because you have to think as an actor, does this Ms. Lorelei actually go out on Purge night. You have to make your choice for yourself. I think the better choice is that, ‘yes she does and she enjoys it’ because she’s expressing her Purge enthusiasm to these children.

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei on ‘Ms. Lorelei’s Corner’ during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” cold opener – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

I’ve always wondered for these kind of scenes, do the youngsters realize and understand what they’re saying, material wise?

As a character, the children really look up to Ms. Lorelei and believe everything she says because she’s their role model. In real life? I don’t think so. In one scene I was supposed to be really close to Zoe’s [Emily Criss Rives] face and I know it’s kind of frightening even as an adult to have someone really close in your face. (laughs) I was like, ‘I gotta go chew some gum!’

I tried to talk to her beforehand just so she sees me as a person, and not this scary person up in her face and be upset. I also think that they understand that they’re acting because all the kids were just amazing. They were so fun, after we’d say cut, they’d be kids again.

It is interesting… I understand what you mean. Would it scare them or would they believe what I was saying as a person and not understand that it’s acting? I think they’re all in the business themselves and know what’s going on or have been told what’s going on.

Young Ben Gardner [Carson Minniear] watching Ms. Lorelei's Corner on The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold open - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Young Ben Gardner [Carson Minniear] watching Ms. Lorelei’s Corner on The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” cold open – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

What was it like for you in general? Is it surreal to work with young actors?

Amazing! Everybody was on the same page, I felt that the way they wanted to see the character was the way I understood the character. It was fun! I really felt that the direction and the costumes… Even the way they filmed it, coming out of the apple box and spinning around really helped create the atmosphere. I was really with it.

Did you draw on any children’s hosts that you watched yourself as a kid to kind of craft Ms. Lorelei?

(laughs) That’s funny, no but I actually did a lot of children’s theatre when I was starting out. I probably drew more on that as Ms. Lorelei because it came very easily to me to play this character… And I do believe it came from doing children’s theatre! Because you’re trying to give that same kind of grand experience and relate to the children.

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei during 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' on The Purge - Screen captured GIF Credit via USA Network

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei during ‘Ms. Lorelei’s Corner’ on The Purge – Screen captured GIF Credit via USA Network

Who did your costume for Ms. Lorelei’s Corner? I thought the design fit perfectly.

Wardrobe’s amazing on that show! The casting was pretty quick so I had to get to wardrobe immediately and try some things on because we were shooting the next day. I thought there were some great clothes but the first ones I saw just didn’t feel right… I was like ehhh. Then there was one dress I’d seen before the audition! (laughs) It kind of called out to me, and it was not the dress you see.

They had to alter it a great deal with all the decorations and the ruffles underneath. They altered it in a matter of hours, it was amazing! They wanted more of a 70s outfit in the script I think, because it was a flashback when he was a child and a different era.

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei dancing spin intro on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei dancing spin intro on ‘Ms. Lorelei’s Corner’ during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” cold opener – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

I liked that they gave Ms. Lorelei those gloves, it really added to the character.

(laughs) Yeah! I do a silly web series, Ginny on the Rocks, and in some of it I wear gloves so I thought it would be cool if Ms. Lorelei had gloves!

Oh, so you personally made that request?

Yeah, I don’t know why, I just thought it would be cool if she had gloves! (laughs) You just have this gorgeous kind of outfit, and if you’re in a children’s show, you’re going to accessorize it. Just to make it fun for the children to watch, and make it a little Princessy and Mickey Mousey, so they can say “Ooooo, that looks cool!”

How do you usually prepare for a role? Do you have any kind of rituals that you’ve kept from the beginning?

I do, it’s like if you’re reading a novel and you see the character in your mind. I try to put myself in the character’s mind and after years of doing it, it really comes faster. You know immediately if you connect to a character. In this case, I definitely did! Sometimes you get it, and sometimes you don’t, they go a different way… But you kind of know from all the past characters you’ve played and all the work you’ve done on other characters in theater, television, movies and and everything else for that final product. It all comes up and adds to that.

I just immediately clicked with this character and I knew exactly in my mind who she was. I also watched two Purge episodes and I don’t normally watch horror! (laughs) I watched Season 2 of The Purge after my episode aired, so I knew what was going on more. I thought the writing, production, and everything about the show was extremely high quality.

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei making a subliminal heart/'love' symbol on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei making a subliminal heart/’love’ symbol on ‘Ms. Lorelei’s Corner’ during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” cold opener – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

The idea itself is just such a good concept for a horror! If you don’t watch a lot of horror, you’re kind of like, ‘I don’t know if I could watch this!’ But it’s like Ben, after your first purging it just keeps getting easier! (laughs) I really enjoyed Season 2 and I watched two episodes from Season 1 before I went into the audition.

I thought I’d have more time to watch but things really move quick and the next day you’re in there. I needed to know the tone of the show because the opening scenes are very different from the actual show itself somehow but yet they’re the same. They’re a little bit more heightened, almost a separate entity but they go right into it.

I felt it was one of the best openers of the season.

Thank you! I did too. (laughs) I mean, I really also enjoyed that first audition, that was kind of creepy.

Did you know you were auditioning for The Purge?

The first episode in the opening scene was this woman auditioning to be the voice of the part. I can’t remember her exact lines but it was pretty cool. I thought it was really well written. It just blows my mind that people can come up with consistently good writing, week after week. They really put a lot of thought into how they’re going to present the series.

I was amazed at the production quality, the directing and writing, everything about it. Sometimes as an actor, you just see a character and you’re like I know this is my character! I just wish it would be on a recurring basis.

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei excited on 'Ms. Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" cold opener - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Mary K. DeVault as Ms. Lorelei excited on ‘Ms. Lorelei’s Corner’ during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” cold opener – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

For sure then, you’d like to reprise Ms. Lorelei on The Purge in a future season?

Oh, I’d like to return to the show or any show I’ve done! You get attached to your characters and you don’t want to let them go. You’ve worked with them for a couple of weeks or from the audition to the time you’re shooting. Well, everything happens so fast, you don’t get that much time. You think about that character and after you shoot it, it’s like a play, a theatre piece, it’s a little difficult to let it go. You want it to return.

Especially, with Ms. Lorelei there’s so many layers to that character. There’s so much more you could do there.

Yeah, there could be other characters that watched Ms. Lorelei’s Corner… I don’t know what they have planned for next season, I think there will be a Season 3. Which will be interesting to see!

How did it feel for you to deliver that line when Zoe asks, “Can they kill people?”, and you respond “Yessssss… They can!” Complete with a massive smile and a giggle.

I had to really make a decision in my mind, ‘Does this woman go out and Purge?’ And I thought, ‘Yeah, I think she does and I think she enjoys it.’ That wouldn’t be me! (laughs) So, I had to find that spot for the character where this is okay, and I’ve been told it’s good for you. You have to as a character really believe that!

It was interesting and complex, particularly, since I used to do comedy a lot more. You sometimes play people who have views that are creepy and you have to connect. I’m not saying to go method and go out and do it (laughs) but really put yourself in that person’s shoes and their beliefs.

They believe what they believe because of everything around them, truly thinking it’s okay. I think Ms. Lorelei thinks she’s doing a good thing, I don’t think she believes she’s doing anything wrong. She’s letting these kids know there’s this whole other world out there, that they can enter into once they’re able. Which builds the suspense creepily!

Emily Criss Rives as Zoe featured on 'Ms Lorelei's Corner' during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 "Hail Mary" - Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

Emily Criss Rives as Zoe featured on ‘Ms Lorelei’s Corner’ during The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” – Screenshot / Photo Credit: USA Network

You mentioned your web series Ginny on the Rocks earlier, can you elaborate more for fans who haven’t seen it yet?

It’s a single camera sitcom but three-four minute episodes starring my character Ginny Penelope Talbotowski. I just wrote the latest set of episodes! It started off originally with my sister taking a directing class, a GoPro camera, and wanting to do a creative project together.

I saw you recently played the character of Melinda in film The Black String. What was that experience like?

Yeah, The Black String is a movie starring Frankie Muniz and I’m in towards the end of the film, I play this scary psychic! It was a really cool part, enjoyed it a lot. The film went the festival route and it was just picked up Amazon.

Curious, do you watch your own work often? Do you ever watch your own takes?

I don’t always. When I first started, I did watch. I was like “Oh my God!” When you first see yourself on-screen, you’re like, ‘Oh wow, that’s weird.’ But then when you keep doing it, you’re seeing yourself as the character, you’re not seeing you anymore. I wonder sometimes how they’ll put a scene together, editing wise. But I don’t evaluate my performance because I always kind of like it! (laughs)

Thanks Mary!

Thank you!

Follow Mary K. DeVault on Social Media

Be sure to subscribe to Mary K. DeVault’s YouTube Channel and Web Series ‘Ginny on the Rocks’, follow her adventures on Instagram and IMDB to see more of her television and film work.

Relive The Purge Season 2 Episode 9 “Hail Mary” in its entirety by purchasing the episode on Amazon!


Check out The Natural Aristocrat’s interviews with The Purge’s Joel Allen on Ben Gardner and Amye Gousset on Lena Dash!

More coverage of USA Network’s The Purge is available on The Natural Aristocrat’s The Purge category section!

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Film

Ellen Toland talks Inside the Rain, objectification and job titles (Interview)

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Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor in film, Inside the Rain - Photo Credit: Art 13
Photo Credit: Art 13

Ellen Toland spoke to The Natural Aristocrat about Inside the Rain’s Emma Taylor and society’s inability to separate job title from human being leading to a culture of objectification.

Ellen Toland’s Emma Taylor in new film Inside the Rain is a quiet looking glass into the day-to-day treatment of commodified human beings. When the fantasy of body sushi and the gentlemen’s club ends and a person trying to resume their regular life off-the-clock begins. Yet, separating the person from their job title appears a distant hope, like spotting individual blades of grass outside. It’s for this reason, among many others, that Emma Taylor finds comfort in another person pre-judged by society. One born with bipolar disorder and treated as such at all times to personal detriment. Even scorned in suspicion for taking their medication due to repetitional bias.

Meet Ben Glass, Inside the Rain’s lead protagonist. Ben is largely defined by one act during Into the Rain, an attempted suicide via overdose. In turn, Ben is later accused of another such attempt when he’s spotted simply organizing his medicine for the week… Leading to an unjust arrest and potential exclusion from university. Thus, Ben Glass decides to make a film about all the events leading up to the arrest as a proactive visual defense. Better Call Saul’s Jimmy McGill once told Scholarship interviewee Kristy Esposito that, ‘You made a mistake and to them that’s all you’ll ever be,’ and it feels highly applicable to Inside the Rain’s plot. Much like Jimmy tried to drive Kristy to fighting forward even without the scholarship, Emma Taylor feels Ben can be advance forward in his life without going back to a University that preemptively shunned him.

This interview contains spoilers for Inside the Rain.

Interview with Ellen Toland on Inside the Rain’s Emma Taylor:

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

Nir Regev [The Natural Aristocrat]: A good portion of TV & Film audiences are unable to disconnect the character they see on-screen from an actor in real life. During Inside the Rain, these fraternity looking, rich jocks bother Emma Taylor outside of the strip club she works at. Unable to separate the fantasy of body sushi from a regular person having a smoke after work. I was wondering how you feel about that?

Ellen Toland: Oh, that’s a really, really good question. I think that’s a feminine issue especially and it’s pretty ingrained in masculine culture. To objectify women, having a hard time separating the fact that they are not an object and something to toy with. I feel that’s what that scene really plays upon because those guys definitely don’t see a difference between a human being and their sushi tray.
And I think that’s a real issue with our culture in general.

It’s something that people really need to assess within themselves. I think that happens with people and titles of their jobs in the first place too. We don’t see past the title of what people do, and we make that their entire identity… And then treat them with that sense.

Do you feel Emma’s openness lends itself to accept a bipolar person intimately into her life despite his involuntarily asylum stay? There’s many that would have second thoughts after seeing someone forcibly institutionalized but you decide to donate Ben $5,000 dollars for his student film.

Yeah, I feel Emma’s seen a lot of different types of people and has a deep well of empathy & understanding for people. She kind of sees that with Ben but I also think it’s matched with Ben’s acceptance of her and building her up. Which I don’t think she’s had a lot of in her own life. It’s the perfect combination of both of them meeting each other exactly where they’re at, building each other up, and ultimately eventually move on in their own lives.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

What was it like shooting the scene where Emma’s having dinner with Ben’s parents and mentions she works at a strip club?

Yeah, Cathy [Curtain] and Paul [Schulze] were lovely, it was great to work with them for a little bit!

I think my choice going into the dinner was that Emma hadn’t been introduced to a lot of parents and treated normally. She’s meeting their possible judgment by just really owning it and trying to almost test them out too and see how they’re going to react. When it’s met with genuine acceptance as well, she’s pleasantly surprised. Shooting that scene was really fun and the restaurant was very sweet to us as well, we ate a huge meal! [laughs] That was great, never bad to get to eat on set, you know?

Catherine Curtin as Emma Glass and Paul Schulze as David Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

I saw an interview with you and Aaron Fisher where he said, ‘During auditions it just kept going back to Ellen, Ellen, Ellen!’ What do you think was that X-Factor won you the role?

Ultimately, I feel Aaron and I had a pretty natural chemistry. One that you can’t really manipulate with actors necessarily. All the pieces fell together. We really had a good energy together and you really need that in a romance. (laughs)

Inside the Rain left things a little bit open ended for the ending. Why do you feel the choice was made not to send the audience home feeling ‘warm and fuzzy’ with a full happy ending?

I mean I think it was also being realistic to what really would happen in real life. Aaron was also basing the film off of his own life. He wanted to play to the truth of that. And I think they both needed to go and own themselves. They’d been given that confidence, and that’s what’s so good about the flash forward at the end.

It showed that that’s why Ben made that choice, that he really could move forward and ended up with the person he was meant to be with. We have people in our life all the time that are just chapters that are meant to lead us to end of our own story, it doesn’t make those chapters any less important.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

Inside the Rain feels so much like art imitating life. I have to ask… Is Emma Taylor the real name of the girl portrayed in the film?

Oh, no it’s not her real name! (laughs) It’s loosely based off of someone but it’s definitely not the same name! There’s elements of Aaron’s life in the film, I’d say 60/40 but the film is loosely biographical. Like the last ten years all stirred around into one movie.

Do you feel being aware that Aaron knew this person impacted your interpretation in any way? Or did you still approach the role in the same way you would any other?

You think about it for sure but you also want to create your own vision of it and own that. Aaron and I definitely talked a ton about Emma but he gave him lots of room to make my own decisions. Aaron’s an actor’s director!

There was kind of a frugal moment toward the end at the fast food joint where Emma is adding everything up on her head. It seemed based on those sexually fueled videos she was making outside of her main job and the $5,000 donation that she’d be rich. How do you feel about that scene?

That scene is trying to say that she’s working really hard to get where she is, and knows the worth of a dollar. Feeling at the same time that Ben hasen’t had that kind of struggle. I think you can be making a lot of money and still be frugal. You remember how hard it was to get there.

Why do you feel that despite ‘red flags’ being present, Emma decides to donate the money for Ben’s film? Did Ben’s dream become Emma’s dream and intertwined at that point?

Yeah it all becomes mixed up. I think it also becomes her dream. Emma sees this person that she cares about and understands how important it is to him. There was no too big of a feat to make that dream come true.

Would you like to reprise the character of Emma Taylor potentially in another film?

I love Emma! She’s so brave and strong, I really adore her. If there is an Inside the Rain: Part 2, sure. I mean Aaron and I are really good buds, I love working with him. I’d love to work with him again, of course!

How much of yourself do you see in Emma as a character?

I think that any person you play, you bring an element of yourself. There’s things that are different, there’s things that are the same but I don’t think it’s necessarily conscious. You just bring as much of your research on their perspective of the world as you can. Whether that’s the way you move or even read things. Maybe there’s pieces of yourself in that. It’s a weird little mixed up bag.

Ellen Toland as Emma Taylor, Aaron Fisher as Ben Glass in film, Inside the Rain – Photo Credit: Art 13

I saw you studied over in RADA, one of the best acting schools in the world. How do you feel it established your foundations as an actress?

It was amazing! I loved it, some of the best professors I ever had were there. It was something I’d always dreamt of doing and I loved London. It was a really important step in developing my craft. Everything that people say about it… It’s all true! It did not disappoint.

Thanks Ellen!

Thank you!

Follow Ellen Toland on Instagram and visit her official website for the latest news on her upcoming projects! Visit InsideTheRainMovie.com to learn more about the film.

Read more Film and Television interviews in The Natural Aristocrat’s Interview category section. Be sure to watch The Natural Aristocrat TV with Host Nir Regev interviewing leading talent in the entertainment and sports industry on-camera!

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Charlotte Nicdao talks Poppy in Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet (Interview)

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Charlotte Nicdao - Mythic Quest Raven's Banquet - David Hornsby, Charlotte Nicdao, Jessie Ennis, Rob McElhenney and F. Murray Abraham in “Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet,” premiering February 7, 2020, on Apple TV+. - Photo Credit: Apple TV+
Photo Credit: Apple TV+

Charlotte Nicdao spoke to The Natural Aristocrat about Poppy’s endearing and eccentric personality quirks like a fascination with dinner parties and shovels on Apple TV+’s Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet.

Charlotte Nicdao took a Myers-Briggs personality test in-character as Poppy to get into the role’s psyche on Apple TV+’s Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet. Nicdao believes Poppy is the type of personality that can become a “mastermind” at any individual specific thing by being hyper-focused on it… But be terrible at everything else in the process. Hence, Poppy’s insistence on making her early season ideas of in-game dinner parties and a seemingly throwaway item like a shovel work.

During a roundtable press interview in New York City, The Natural Aristocrat discussed the makeup of Poppy’s personality with Charlotte Nicdao and why sometimes ‘a shovel’ is more than a shovel.

This interview contains minor spoilers for Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet.

Interview with Charlotte Nicdao on Poppy:


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The Natural Aristocrat [Nir Regev]: Poppy has these unique personality quirks about her like being exceptionally keen on dinner parties or even shovels. I think that says a lot about her character’s backstory. Do you feel it’s true that Poppy has never been to a dinner party before?

Charlotte Nicdao: We did have this idea that she’s incredibly intelligent but just can’t get her head around how to connect people. That’s the thing that Ian, Rob’s character, is really, really good at. And maybe part of the reason that Poppy isn’t able to get credit that she deserves. But Poppy just doesn’t really understand how other people function. I did this thing before we started shooting called a Myers-Briggs test for the character. You know those personality tests? I answered it the way that I thought that Poppy would answer it and it was fascinating what came out.

Poppy has a personality type, and I think this is really accurate to the character, who would become focused on one specific thing and become a mastermind at it. And it could be anything! So, this kind of person could choose to be social and be brilliant at it… But be terrible at everything else. And I think that’s who she is. Poppy’s the most brilliant coder in the world! Everything else is just a mess. (laughs)


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Was the use of a shovel supposed to be a symbolic metaphor for always trying to kind of dig yourself out of Ian’s plans?

I didn’t think of it like that but I like that analogy! I think it was a really cool idea for me that Poppy is someone who’s basically been with the game since its inception… And is in charge of creating all these ideas that Ian has, turning them into something that’s playable. The thing that she holds dearest to her in the expansion, her beloved idea, is a tool that allows the players to do what she’s done: create something that’s lasting, that then other players can interact with. I thought that that was quite beautiful, which is not something that you would usually think of in association with a shovel.


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There’s a part in Mythic Quest: Raven’s Quest where Poppy tells her boss David [David Hornsby], ‘you know that’s why your wife left you.’ That was pretty brutal! How did it make you feel to say those words?

Megan Ganz (Series Co-Creator/Writer/Executive Producer) came up with that on-set. She came up to me and was like, “When she says this, throw that in!” I love it when Megan is on-set, she gives me really good jokes!

Thanks Charlotte!

Thank you!

Charlotte Nicdao on Social Media:


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Follow Charlotte Nicdao on Twitter and Instagram!

The Natural Aristocrat recently interviewed Charlotte Nicdao’s Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet co-star F. Murray Abraham (C.W. Longbottom) on his role and backstory on the series.

Watch Apple TV+’s new gaming development/streaming world comedy sitcom series Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet now.

More Interviews at The Natural Aristocrat:

Be sure to check out The Natural Aristocrat’s recent on-camera interview with Katharina Kubrick (Stanley Kubrick’s daughter) and the launch of The Natural Aristocrat TV for more video interviews!

Read more Interview Transcripts with top industry talents in Film & TV, Animation, Gaming, and more!

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F. Murray Abraham talks C.W. backstory in Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet (Interview)

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Mythic Quest - Raven's Banquet - Season 1 | Episode 2 Rob McElhenney (Ian) and F. Murray Abraham (C.W. Longbottom) in “Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet,” premiering February 7, 2020, on Apple TV+. - Photo Credit: Apple TV+
Photo Credit: Apple TV+

F. Murray Abraham spoke to The Natural Aristocrat about the backstory of C.W. Longbottom on Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, one of the definitive highlights of the new Apple TV+ series.

Oscar winner F. Murray Abraham’s ‘C.W. Longbottom’ is one of the top reasons to watch Apple TV+’s new gaming focused comedy series Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet. C.W. Longbottom is a writer still living off the prime of his prose, providing backstories for the show’s ‘faux’ game Mythic Quest… While laying hints to the groundwork that led to ink on paper, including a lost love that led to a lengthy stay at a hospital. If you get the drift!

F. Murray Abrahjam’s uncanny pitch-perfect comedy timing is a driving force on the show’s opening episodes. During a roundtable press interview in New York City ahead of the show’s Apple TV+ premiere, The Natural Aristocrat discussed the mysterious C.W. with F. Murray Abraham and the vital importance of a backstory.

This interview contains minor spoilers for Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet.

The Natural Aristocrat [Nir Regev]: My favorite part of your character C.W. is the mystery surrounding your own backstory while simultaneously being the giver of backstories. Throughout Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, C.W. peppers in these hints like the girl he had a fling with in Morocco inspiring him. Poppy [Charlotte Nicdao] yells at C.W. around episode 2, “Enough with the backstory!” As an actor, have you ever picked up a script in your career and thought there was too much backstory?

F. Murray Abraham: I could be flip and say everybody else is a back story. (laughs) I’ve worked with Harold Pinter, he directed me in my first Broadway show. That was a play that he bought, we became friends. He became friendly with quite a few people, he’s a good guy. He didn’t look like he was, he was called the Sphinx but in fact he was very funny. Anyway, we had a play of his that was being done in town at the same time, and he was overseeing it. It was an off-Broadway production and there was something wrong with it. We were looking at the script and talking about it… He said, ‘I want to cut this and I want to cut this and try this. It’s not working.’ I said, “You have to try it, you really have to try it and try it and try it before you throw it out.” Because I believe that the discovery is not over until it’s absolutely impossible.

In a time crunch business like this one, you don’t have that much time. So, going into it with a good script which is what these have been so far, is really essential. My backstory, I want to examine that more and more because what he represents when I’m talking about another century, which is what it is, another century. It was kind of the heyday in the 60s and 70s for writers. There was a lot of money being thrown around. So, if I said at that time because I had won a series of awards, my character, ‘Yes, I want to write this book but I want to write it in Morocco. I want to write it in New Orleans. I want to write it there.’ I mean C.W. could do that and it was a style. It was a way of living. It was fun to travel in those days and it was possible to introduce his idea of a back story, his idea of how much it meant.

I think that he was kind of coddled at the time. And he still is coddled in a way in this current situation, he’s looked after, kind of. He’s put up with for certain things. I feel that backstory is essential. Ms. (Ashley) Burch brought this up earlier, fighting for the back story is something that she does because she understands the value of it. I think it’s essential to the success of this series, that each of us starts to reveal their backstories because it’s not enough to see how friendly we are with each other. And we are by the way! We have to start seeing the characters fleshed out a little more. I would like to see something on my character’s tragedy. I would like to touch on that. Or a love. There is much to explore!

C.W. is my favorite character on Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, your comedy timing is so precise.

Thank you, I love the character! How can you not like playing this character? I’m a flamboyant actor to begin with. My favorite characters on stage have always been that kind of character. I love Opera and one of the reasons is the gesture. I think that the theatre is suffering because it’s too kitchen sink stuff. I think it’s more designed for a stage as a stepping stone to the movies and television. There’s nothing wrong with that but the essence of the theater, the size of the theater is missing. I think it’s necessary.

Circuses and Opera are fun because of that size. I live for it. But if you were to try to capture what it means to go to a Greek drama. Some Greek tragedy pick one, Oedipus. They really only lasted if you do them, the way they were supposed to be done written. It’s only about an hour long and at the end you’ve come out of this with a cathartic experience… But that can only be accomplished by the screaming and the Sturm und Drang on the sides. And I think this character still is attached to that world.

He’s funny because he’s absolutely sincere about it and I’m sincere too. But also he just has a good time, I think it’s important that he relishes this life. I think it’s one of the things that keeps him alive and keeps him functioning. What it does is keeps him youngish. I feel the same way about myself. I believe that the only way to stay young at least in your mind, in your heart, is to work with younger people and to continue to work. Some of us are not lucky enough to continue to work, to get to work.

I believe you can find the work, whether you are a famous actor or you are still struggling. As an older man in this business, there are so many theaters in New York, you will find a place to work if you put yourself out there. Even if it means reading plays. What I’m suggesting is that in this production, in this series, you have four generations of actors. I don’t think there is another show that can claim that. And it’s not just an old guy who happens to be peripheral. He really has something to say and it’s important to him, and it becomes important to the show.

But more importantly or as important, he has something to learn. And he’s not beyond learning! That’s an interesting aspect of this character, and that’s where Ashly (Burch) steps in because she takes it on herself… Without being snotty and nasty to me, to teach me how to do this. In return, I try to teach her what it’s like to work the classics into her work.

Just wanted to say, I really enjoy your work as Dar Adal on Homeland!

Oh man, those are some great scripts!

Thanks Murray!

Thank you!

Watch Apple TV+’s new gaming development/streaming world comedy sitcom series Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet now.

Be sure to check out The Natural Aristocrat’s recent on-camera interview with Katharina Kubrick (Stanley Kubrick’s daughter) and the launch of The Natural Aristocrat TV for more video interviews!

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